Welcome to Dive Log Australasia

Dive Log is the premier scuba diving monthly magazine that provides all the latest scuba news and information from across Australia and the Asia/Pacific region. You can read our monthly magazine free by clicking on the Latest Edition tab, above or find it at your nearest Newsagent for $4.95. Dive Log is also available at selected dive stores and on your tablet or mobile phone by clicking at the above link . Each month we look at the key issues that effect us all as divers as well as look at great diving locations in the region as well as the perfect scuba diving holiday destinations. We also review the latest diving equipment and gear and scuba courses and certifications, to ensure you are always up to date with the latest and best things happening in the scuba diving industry.

SOUTHERN DUMPLING
SQUID
By STEVE WALSH & NAOMI STRONG

DIVE SITES OF
MUNDA
By NIGEL MARSH & HELEN ROSE

HUNTING FOR 
SEADRAGONS
By STEVE JONES

Adorable. Intelligent. Quirky.
The Southern Dumpling Squid, Euprymna tasmanica
Location: Endemic to Southern waters of Australia, from 0.5-80m depths.
Lifespan: Approximately 7 months.
Size: Maximum 7cm.
Diet:  Carnivores, feeding on small fish and crustaceans.
Nocturnal:  Emerge at night to hunt and mate.
Photos simply do not do Southern Dumpling Squid justice. Grab a torch, a buddy and dive in after the sun goes down to experience the dynamic colours and quirky behaviour of this adorable cephalopod.


OVER the years we have done numerous trips to the Solomon Islands and explored many of its World War II plane wrecks, but we had never seen anything like this before. Sitting in the sand before us was an almost intact Japanese Zero fighter plane. Now we have seen other Zero fighter planes before, but this one was very unique, as on its side was Japanese text, still very clear and readable after 75 years underwater. This amazing plane wreck was just one of the unique dive sites we enjoyed on a recent trip to Munda.
Located in the Western Provinces of the Solomon Islands, Munda is a small town with a big reputation for wonderful diving.


When you say to some people that spotting leafy seadragons can be difficult they reply,
“Really, how can that be.
Aren’t they bright orange?”
KNOWN as one of the animal kingdom’s true masters of camouflage, leafy seadragons, as their name and appearance suggests, use their leaf-like appendages to blend in with the green and brown seagrasses and seaweed in which they like to reside.
Wait up, how can something that’s “bright orange” and, may I add, grows to more than 30cm in length, “blend in” with a seabed covered in green/brown foliage…

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